Category Archives: Moving Day

B Vitamins (Folate, B6, B12) Reduce Homocysteine Levels Produced by Carbidopa/Levodopa Therapy

“The excitement of vitamins, nutrition and metabolism permeated the environment.” Paul D. Boyer

“A substance that makes you ill if you don’t eat it.” Albert Szent-Gyorgy

Introduction: Claire McLean, an amazing-PT who is vital to my life managing my Parkinson’s, posted a very interesting article about the generation of homocysteine from the metabolism of levodopa to dopamine in the brain. Here is the article:

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This was all a very new concept to me. And as an ‘old-time’ biochemist by training, it led me down a trail of wonderful biochemical pathways and definitely a story worth retelling  for anyone taking carbidopa/levodopa.  Excessive generation of homocysteine leads to something called hyper-homocysteinuria, which is very detrimental to the cardiovascular system and even the neurological system.  Over time this could lead to a depletion of several B vitamins, which themselves would have biochemical consequences. This post is about the supplementation with a complex of B vitamins (including a cautionary note) during long-term therapy with carbidopa/levodopa.

“There are living systems; there is no ‘living matter’.” Jacques Monod

A reminder about Parkinson’s, dopamine and carbidopa/levodopa:  Someone with Parkinson’s  has reduced  synthesis of dopamine, an essential neurotransmitter produced by the substantia nigra of the midbrain region. A common medical treatment for Parkinson’s is the replacement of dopamine with its immediate precursor levodopa. Here are some of the key aspects regarding use of carbidopa/levodopa for treating Parkinson’s:

  1. Dopamine does not make it through the blood brain barrier to get to the brain;
  2. Levodopa (also known as L-3,4,-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is an amino acid that can cross the blood brain barrier and then be converted to dopamine;
  3. In the G.I. tract and the bloodstream, levodopa can be converted to dopamine by an enzyme named aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase (DOPA decarboxylase or DDC),  which reduces the amount of levodopa that reaches the brain;
  4.  Carbidopa is a small molecule that prevents DOPA decarboxylase from converting levodopa to dopamine;
  5.  Carbidopa cannot pass through the blood brain barrier;
  6.  The “gold standard” treatment for Parkinson’s is a combination of carbidopa/levodopa, these drugs are commonly known as Sinemet, Sinemet CR, and Parcopa;
  7.  To review, we ingest carbidopa/levodopa, the carbidopa inhibits tissue enzymes that would break down the levodopa, this allows the levodopa to reach the blood-brain barrier, and then get converted to dopamine in the brain.
  8. Important side-note: Levodopa is an amino acid that crosses the blood brain barrier through a molecular amino acid transporter that binds amino acids.  Thus, eating and digestion of a protein-rich meal (also to be broken down to amino acids) either before or with your carbidopa/levodopa dose would competitively lower transport of levodopa across the blood brain barrier.  You should have been advised to take your carbidopa/levodopa doses (i) on an empty stomach, (ii) ~1 hr before eating or (iii) ~1-2 hr after eating (assuming you can tolerate it and the drug doesn’t cause nausea); this would insure your dose of levodopa gets across the blood brain barrier.

Here are the structures of the main players (top-left panel is levodopa; top-right panel is carbidopa; and the most commonly used dose is 25/100 immediate release carbidopa-levodopa (tablet with 25 mg carbidopa and 100 mg levodopa) on the bottom panel.

“The quality of your life is dependent upon the quality of the life of your cells. If the bloodstream is filled with waste products, the resulting environment does not promote a strong, vibrant, healthy cell life-nor a biochemistry capable of creating a balanced emotional life for an individual.” Tony Robbins

What’s the big deal about homocyteine (Hcy)?  Homocysteine is a sulfur-containing amino acid formed by demethylation of the essential amino acid methionine. Methionine is first modified to form S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the direct precursor of Hcy,  This is important because SAM serves as a methyl-group “donor” in almost all biochemical pathways that need methylation (see figure below).  There are pathways that Hcy follows; importantly, the B vitamins of B6, B12 and folic acid are required for proper recycling/processing of Hcy.   An abnormal increase in levels of Hcy says that some disruption of this cycle has occurred.     Elevated Hcy is associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations, mostly affecting the central nervous system. Elevated Hcy has also been associated with an increased risk for atherosclerotic and thrombotic vascular diseases.  The mechanism for how Hcy damages tissues and cells remains under study; however, many favor the notion that excess Hcy increases oxidative stress.  As you might see why from the figure below, Hcy concentrations may increase as a result of deficiency in folate, vitamin B6 or B12. To recap, Hcy is a key biochemical metabolite focused in the essential methyl-donor pathway, whereby successful utilization of Hcy requires a role for complex B vitamins.  By contrast,  there is substantial evidence for a role of elevated Hcy as a disease risk factor for the cardiovascular and central nervous systems.

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“We need truth to grow in the same way that we need vitamins, affection and love.” Gary Zukav

Sustained use of carbidopa/levodopa can result in elevated levels of homocysteine: As shown below, one of the reactions on levodopa involves methylation to form a compound named 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD).   The reaction involves the enzyme catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) and requires SAM as the methyl group donor. There is evidence that plasma Hcy levels are higher in carbidopa/levodopa-treated Parkinson’s patients when compared to controls and untreated Parkinson’s patients.  Interpretation of these results suggest the elevated Hcy levels is due to the drug itself and not from Parkinson’s.

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B vitamins (folate, B6, B12) reduce homocysteine produced by carbidopa/levodopa therapy:   Based on the cycle and loops drawn below, they are not strictly one-way in  that theoretically you can drive the reaction in the reverse direction by using an excess amount of folate (NIH fact sheet, click here), vitamin B6 (NIH fact sheet, click here) and vitamin B12 (NIH fact sheet, click here) to reduce levels of Hcy. Folate supplementation was  previously found to reduces Hcy levels when used to treat an older group of people with vascular disease. Using the scheme depicted below as given in the slideshow there are four points I’d like to make:

  1. One might envision the brain is constantly processing a very small amount of levodopa to dopamine throughout the day. By contrast, we take 100’s of         milligram quantities of levodopa several times a day almost as if  we are giving ourselves a bolus of the precursor that reaches the brain. This scheme suggests that L-DOPA + SAM by COMT will produce Hcy; Over time ↑Hcy levels would be generated, leading to hyper-Hcy. Implied by hyper-Hcy is the consumption of B vitamins like folate, B12 and B6; deficiency of these vitamins would contribute to the body being unable to metabolize the excess Hcy.
  2. The folate/vitamin B12 cycle is crucial for DNA synthesis in our body.  This cycle verifies the essential role of folate and vitamin B12 in our diet and demonstrates their function in a key biochemical pathway. This also suggests that making too much Hcy could potentially consume both folate and B12, which would be detrimental to you. By contrast, the cycle also implies that by taking excess  folate and vitamin B12 you might drive the reaction the other direction and reduce the amount of Hcy generated,  and preserve the biochemical integrity of the cycle.
  3.  The processing of HCy is somewhat dependent on vitamin B6.  In the presence of excess Hcy you would consume the vitamin B6 ; however, the cycle also implies in the presence of an excess of vitamin B6 would allow the processing of Hcy further downstream.
  4.  Finally, unrelated to the B vitamins, the addition of N-Acetyl-cysteine (NAC) to the pathway would generate glutathione, which would help consume the excess Hcy  and also generate a very potent antioxidant compound.

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“1914…Dr. Joseph Goldberger had proven that (pellagra) was related to diet, and later showed that it could be prevented by simply eating liver or yeast. But it wasn’t until the 1940’s…that the ‘modern’ medical world fully accepted pellagra as a vitamin B deficiency.” G. Edward Griffin

Beware of taking a huge excess of vitamin B6 in the presence of carbidopa/levodopa, a cautionary tale: I started taking a supplement that had relatively large amounts of complex B vitamins  (specifically the one labeled number two below) had 100% (400 mcg) folate, 1667% (100 mcg) vitamin B12 and 5000% (100 mg) of vitamin B6 (based on daily requirement from our diet).   Over a period of several days I started feeling stiffer, weaker as if  my medicine had stopped treating my Parkinson’s. I especially noticed it one day while playing golf because I had lost significant yardage on my shots, I was breathing heavily, and I was totally out of sync with my golf swing.  Just in general, my entire body was not functioning well.  Timing wise, I was taking the complex B vitamin pill with my early morning carbidopa/levodopa pill on an empty stomach. Something was suddenly (not subtly) wrong with the way I was feeling, and the only new addition to my treatment strategy was this complex B  vitamin pill. There had to be an explanation.

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I went home and started thinking like a biochemist, started searching the Internet as an academic scientist, and found the answer in the old archives of the literature.  The older literature says taking more than 15 mg of vitamin B6 daily could compromise the effectiveness of carbidopa to protect levodopa from being activated in the tissues. Thus, I may have been compromising at least one or more doses of levodopa daily by taking 100 mg of vitamin B6 daily.  Let me further say I found that the half-life of vitamin B6 was 55 hours; furthermore, assuming 3L of plasma to absorb the vitamin B6, and a daily dose of 100 mg I plotted the vitamin B6 levels in my bloodstream. The calculation is based on a simple, single compartment elimination model assuming 100% absorbance that happens immediately. The equation is: concentration in plasma (µg/ml vitamin B6) = dose/volume * e^(-k*t) :

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And further inspection of the possible reaction properties between vitamin B6, carbidopa and even levodopa suggests that vitamin B6 could be forming a Schiff Base, which would totally compromise the ability of either compound to function biologically (this is illustrated below).   And I should have known this because some of my earliest publications studied the binding site of various proteins and they were identified using vitamin B6 modifying the amino groups of the proteins (we were mapping heparin-binding sites):

Church, F.C., C.W. Pratt, C.M. Noyes, T. Kalayanamit, G.B. Sherrill, R.B. Tobin, and J.B. Meade (1989) Structural and functional properties of human α-thrombin, phosphopyridoxylated-α-thrombin and γT-thrombin: Identification of lysyl residues in α-thrombin that are critical for heparin and fibrin(ogen) interactions.  J. Biol. Chem. 264: 18419-18425.

Peterson, C.B., C.M. Noyes, J.M. Pecon, F.C. Church and M.N. Blackburn (1987)  Identification of a lysyl residue in antithrombin which is essential for heparin binding.  J. Biol. Chem.  262: 8061-8065.

Whinna, H.C., M.A. Blinder, M. Szewczyk, D.M. Tollefsen and F.C. Church (1991) Role of lysine 173 in heparin binding to heparin cofactor II.  J. Biol. Chem.  266: 8129-813

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“…The Chinese in the 9th century AD utilized a book entitled The Thousand Golden Prescriptions, which described how rice polish could be used to cure beri~beri, as well as other nutritional approaches to the prevention and treatment of disease. It was not until twelve centuries later that the cure for beri~beri was discovered in the West, and it acknowledged to be a vitamin B-1 deficiency disease.” Jeffrey Bland

To take or not to take, complex B vitamin supplementation:  I literally have been writing and working on this post since July; it started as a simple story about the use of complex B vitamins to reduce homocysteine levels as a consequence of chronic carbidopa/levodopa use to manage Parkinson’s.   If you eat a good healthy diet you’re getting plenty of B vitamins. Do you need mega-doses of complex B vitamins? My cautionary note described taking very large amounts of vitamin B6 may be compromising both carbidopa and/or levodopa. You should talk with your Neurologist because it’s straightforward to measure folate, vitamin B6 and B12, and homocysteine levels to see if they are in the normal range if you are taking carbidopa/levodopa. The hidden subplot behind the story is the growing awareness and importance of managing homocysteine levels and also knowing the levels of folate, B6 and B12 to help maintain your neurological health.  Bottom line, if you need it, take a multiple vitamin with only 100 to 200% of your daily need of vitamin B6 (what is shown in panel three and four above). And please be careful if you decide to take a larger dose of vitamin B6 (between 10-100 mg/day).

“A risk-free life is far from being a healthy life. To begin with, the very word “risk” implies worry, and people who worry about every bite of food, sip of water, the air they breathe, the gym sessions they have missed, and the minutiae of vitamin doses are not sending positive signals to their cells. A stressful day sends constant negative messaging to the feedback loop and popping a vitamin pill or choosing whole wheat bread instead of white bread does close to zero to change that.” Deepak Chopra

Cover photo credit:

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Parkinson’s Awareness Month: Greetings from North Carolina, USA

With Parkinson’s you have two choices: You can let it control you, or you can control it. And I’ve chosen to control it.” US Senator Isakson

“Perhaps I am stronger than I think.” Thomas Merton

Précis: A brief overview about Parkinson’s disease, highlights from our Moving Day NC Triangle Planning Committee during “Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month”, and some interesting points about the State of North Carolina.

Parkinson’s disease overview:

“The strongest people are not those who show strength in front of us but those who win battles we know nothing about.” Anonymous

Parkinson’s disease awareness month: Parkinson’s awareness month is exactly that.  You simply start by making people around you familiar with this disorder.  And you can help others learn more about this neurodegenerative disease. Blake Tedder, our Parkinson’s Foundation Community Development Manager, has been busy.  He has been requesting/receiving proclamations recognizing and acknowledging the impact of Parkinson’s.  We will be thanking Blake for the rest of the year in his tireless effort on Parkinson’s disease; from all of us on the Moving Day planning committee, thank you Blake!

“We aren’t victims, we are strong, amazing people who just happen to have a crummy disease, and we want a cure to that disease”  Kate Matheson

Partial list of events where we have received proclamations (click here for the complete list- 2017PAM_Proclamations_final):

  • Town of Carrboro – Tuesday March 28th 7:30pm – Carrboro Town Hall, Carrboro
    Attending: Blake Tedder, National Parkinson Foundation
    Frank Church, PhD, UNC School of Medicine, Moving Day Planning committee, PWP;
  • Wake County – Monday April 3rd– 5:00pm – Wake Justice Building, Raleigh
    Attending: David E. Malarkey, DVM/PhD, Councilor, People with Parkinson’s Advisory Council, Parkinson’s Foundation;
  • Durham – Monday April 3rd– 7:00pm – Wake Justice Building, Raleigh
    Attending: Blake Tedder, MSW, National Parkinson Foundation
    Jeaninne Wagner, Moving Day Planning committee, PWP;
  • Orange County – Tuesday April 4th– 7:00pm – Whitted Building, Hillsborough
    Attending: Blake Tedder, MSW, National Parkinson Foundation
    Susan Gerbeth-Jones, MS, Orange County Resident, PWP;
  • Durham County – Tuesday April 11th– 7:00pm – Durham County Building/Main St, Durham|
    Attending: Blake Tedder, MSW, National Parkinson Foundation;
  • Town of Chapel Hill – Monday April 17th7:00pm – Chapel Hill Town Hall, Chapel Hill
    Attending: Blake Tedder, MSW, National Parkinson Foundation
    Frank Church, PhD, UNC School of Medicine, Moving Day Planning committee, PWP
    Jessica Shurer, MSW, Social Worker/Coordinator UNC Department of Neurology Movement Disorders Clinic;
  • Received via Mail or outside of a Formal Meeting:
    State of North Carolina – Governor Roy Cooper
    North Carolina Senate – Sen. Floyd McKissick
    Town of Cary –  Mayor Weinbrecht
    Town of Hillsborough – Mayor Tom Stevens
    City of Raleigh – Mayor Nancy MacFarlane

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“Chris[topher] Reeve wisely parsed the difference between optimism and hope. Unlike optimism, he said, ‘Hope is the product of knowledge and the projection of where the knowledge can take us.” Michael J. Fox

10-interesting points about North Carolina (click here for the complete list):

  • The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill is the oldest State University in the United States.
  • In 1903 the Wright Brothers made the first successful powered flight by man at Kill Devil Hill near Kitty Hawk. The Wright Memorial at Kitty Hawks now commemorates their achievement.
  • Mount Mitchell in the Blue Ridge Mountains is the highest peak east of the Mississippi. It towers 6,684 feet above sea level.
  • The first English colony in America was located on Roanoke Island. Walter Raleigh founded it. The colony mysteriously vanished with no trace except for the word “Croatoan” scrawled on a nearby tree.
  • High Point is known as the Furniture Capital of the World.
  • Babe Ruth hit his first home run in Fayetteville on March 7, 1914.
  • The Biltmore Estate in Ashville is America’s largest home, and includes a 255-room chateau, an award-winning winery and extensive gardens.
  • Pepsi was invented and first served in New Bern in 1898.
  • North Carolina leads the nation in furniture, tobacco, brick, and textile production.
  • Arnold Palmer recognized as the player whose aggressive play and winning personality raised golf to national attention, honed his skills on the championship golf team of Wake Forest University.

The State motto of North Carolina is “Esse quam videri” (To be rather than to seem),  which says be who you really are instead of who/how you want people to think you are.  Here is an editorial about our State motto (click here to read it).

A few closing personal comments about North Carolina: I was 24 years old in 1978 when I moved to Raleigh, North Carolina to begin working on my PhD.  Thirty-nine years later, I still call North Carolina home.  For 35 years I’ve been in Chapel Hill and working at UNC-Chapel Hill.  This is a beautiful state, with mountains on the western edge and the ocean on the eastern side.  We are quite blessed geographically.  We seem to be a ‘melting-pot’ for many from the northeast, midwest and western states to move here for career or to retire.  I really think we have nice 4-season weather (usually). The pictures below highlight just a few areas: beaches, mountains, beautiful downtown skyline of Charlotte, and the town of Chapel Hill (which changes dramatically when UNC-CH wins a national basketball championship).  I’ve been branded the ‘northerner of my family’ (my roots are in Louisiana and Alabama), but I’ve grown to really enjoy calling North Carolina home.  

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“Always remember, your life matters now with Parkinson’s as much as it did before Parkinson’s. Stay hopeful as you navigate adversity, stay you in spite of your Parkinson’s.” Frank C. Church

Cover photo credit: wallpapersdsc.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Red-Tulips-Pictures.jpg

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Life-Journey with Parkinson’s Blog (2016-2017): Recap of Quotes, Service, and Research

“Give your life a destination.” Debasish Mridha

“We’re all a beautiful, wonderful work in progress….Embrace the process!” Nanette Mathews

Précis: This post is a review of my public journey and life-steps with Parkinson’s in the 2nd year of the blog: i) rationale for the blog; ii) quotes/highlights from selected posts between March 2016-March 2017; iii) overview of service activities/events; iv) research and the 4th World Parkinson Congress; v) some of the people that make a difference in my life, and vi) six favorite cover photos from the past year.

Update on I’m Still Here: Journey and Life with Parkinson’s

A thought from Day 01: On March 9, 2015, I began my journey and Parkinson’s-life-story with this blog.  The first blog post ended with the following comment: “I am trying to live life well and authentically, and not be defined by my PD. With the help of family, friends, colleagues, and personal physicians, my goals are to stay positive and strive to keep focused on what matters the most…I am still here!”

Foundational themes of the blog:  The overall goal of the blog is divided between these topics: (a) to describe living with Parkinson’s (“Life Lessons”); (b) to present emerging medical strategies for dealing with Parkinson’s (“Medical Education”); (c) to provide a support mechanism for anyone with Parkinson’s or another neurodegenerative disorder (“Strategy for Living”); and (d) to give an overview of the scientific aspects of Parkinson’s (“Translating Science”).  I really appreciate your continual support, feedback, critiques, and suggestions for future topics (here’s an example): “I enjoy reading your informative blog posts. I believe that addressing the many frustrations of living with Parkinson’s as you are doing with such “matter of factness” and then with a plan of action, must be inspiring to others dealing with the same.  All the while working so hard to maintain your positive outlook…the mental exercise! The other side of the overall challenge in this competition with Parkinson’s Disease to live your present life fully.” If there are some specific topics/life aspects of Parkinson’s you’d like for me to research and present here, please send me the topic(s).  If there is some format change in presentation you’d like to see to improve the readability of future posts, please send me a suggestion.

Quotes and highlights from selected posts from March 2016-March 2017:

  1. “As a long-time educator, I feel that my daily lesson plans are partly derived from my life-experiences and that my syllabus is the sum of my life’s journey.”  From Parkinson’s and the Positivity of Michael J. Fox (click here to read post).
  2. “A regular aerobic exercise program likely helps to promote the appropriate conditions for the injured brain to undergo neuroplasticity.”  From Déjà Vu and Neuroplasticity in Parkinson’s (click here to read post).
  3. We are identified by our characteristic symptoms of our unwanted companion named Parkinson’s. We are all in this together, united by our disorder; held together by those who love and care for us.” From Update on I’m Still Here: Life with Parkinson’s (click here to read post).
  4. While we wait for the potion that slows progression, we exercise and remain hopeful. While we live with a neurodegenerative disorder, we strive to remove the label and we stay positive.” From Parkinson’s Treatment With Dopamine Agonist, Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), and Exercise(click here to read post).
  5. Living with Parkinson’s requires you to adapt to its subtle but progressive changes over a long period of time; you need to remain hopeful for many different things.” From Chapter 1: A Parkinson’s Reading Companion on Hope (click here to read post).
  6. “This disorder robs you physically of mobility and flexibility, so maintaining physical strength is really important. This disorder robs you emotionally and this deficit is bigger than the physical defects; thus, to thrive with Parkinson’s demands several character strengths.” From Chapter 3: A Parkinson’s Reading Companion on Strength (click here to read post).
  7. “Life with Parkinson’s is best lived in the current moment without dwelling on the past and dreading the future.”  From Chapter 8: A Parkinson’s Reading Companion on Mindfulness (click here to read post).
  8. “The journey with Parkinson’s requires effort, teamwork, awareness, and a heart-fueled positive attitude to keep going.”  From Chapter 9: A Parkinson’s Reading Companion on Journey (click here to read post).
  9. “Consider your disorder, you must be able to embrace this unexpected turn in your life and manage the best you can. Personalize your disorder and understand its nuances on you; then you will be able to successfully navigate life in its daily presence.” From 9 Life Lessons from 2016 Commencement Speeches (click here to read post).
  10. “I truly believe that the effort most people are using to handle their disorder puts them in a healthier and better lifestyle to manage their symptoms. An emerging predominate picture of Parkinson’s today is a person striving to live strongly.” From The Evolving Portrait of Parkinson’s (click here to read post).
  11. “Believe in Life in the Presence of Parkinson’s”: Every thought expressed here matters to me (click here to read post).
  12. “Your home may change many times over the coming years. Let your heart tell you where your home is.” From 2016 Whitehead Lecture: Advice, Life Stories and the Journey with Parkinson’s (click here to read post).
  13.  “Here’s a simple mindfulness experience/moment: simply be aware of the steam leaving your morning cup of coffee/tea, clear your immediate thoughts, then sip, focus and savor this moment.”  From 7 Healthy Habits For Your Brain (click here to read post).
  14. “You’ve played 17 holes of golf, and you approach the 18th hole to finish the round. This is a long par three with a lake between you on the tee box and the putting surface.  Your three golf buddies have already safely hit their balls over the lake;  you  launch the ball over the water and safely onto the green (this is a big deal).  Without Parkinson’s, your facial expression and your exuberance are so obvious.  With Parkinson’s, your joy and exuberance are still over-flowing inwardly yet it is displayed in a more muted manner.”  From The Mask of Parkinson’s (click here to read post).
  15. “We must remain hopeful that advances in Parkinson’s treatment are being made and that our understanding of the science of Parkinson’s is continuing to evolve.”  From 2016: The Year in Parkinson’s (click here to read post).
  16. “Since receiving my Parkinson’s diagnosis, my opinion of exercise has changed.  With Parkinson’s, I’m now exercising as if my life depends on it.”  From 9 Things to Know About Exercise-induced Neuroplasticity in Human Parkinson’s (click here to read post).

Service and research:
Service- I was most fortunate to be able to participate in 2 ways for the 4th World Parkinson Congress (WPC), first as a member of the Communications Committee, World Parkinson Coalition; second, as the Co-Editor, Daily Parkinson eNewspaper for the 4th WPC.  And it gave me an opportunity to work with the very talented Eli Pollard (Executive Director WPC).  A truly amazing Editorial Board was assembled of PD advocates, researchers, experts, PwP, and just a superb group of people devoted to Parkinson’s (click here to read the Editorial Board Biographical Sketches).   This was a meaningful experience to have worked with the Editorial Board, a real honor.

Being part of the Planning Committee, Moving Day NC Triangle, headed up by Jessica Shurer, was such fun.  This was my first year on the committee; however, it was my second year to organize a team for Moving Day.

PWR!Moves® Instructor Workshop Certificate. Spent a weekend in Greenville, SC to participate and get certified in PWR!Moves (PWR = Parkinson Wellness Recovery).  To sum it up is easy, truly an amazing event.  I was fortunate to have an experienced-talented instructor and a group of personal trainers committed to working with PwP (click here to read the blog post describing the PWR! experience). Although I was happy to contribute as the person-with-Parkinson’s and go through the exercise routines for everyone, it was even more fun getting trained and certified in PWR!Moves.

Research-  One of the new directions in my life is a shift in the focus of my research away from hematology and to Parkinson’s.  I keep asking myself, why? and keep answering why not!  The process is just like everything else related to research and grant applications; you read, plan, write, submit, and wait.  However, I am pleased to say that CJ’s fellowship entitled “Localization of Proteases and their Inhibitors in Parkinson’s Disease” was funded by UNC-CH.  It’s a start…we begin gathering data next month.  And I am so proud of CJ for seeking (and obtaining) funding to get us started in the science of Parkinson’s.

“Life is like a roller-coaster with thrills, chills, and a sigh of relief.” Susan Bennett

The people that make a difference in my life: Collectively, everyone here gives me strength each and every day of my journey with this disorder.

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Above- Barbara, the best care-partner/best friend/best everything; I can’t imagine being here and doing all of this without your never-ending love and support.

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Top and bottom right panels above- lab/research group [especially important are CJ (currently working in the lab) and Mac (a long-time collaborator) and Chantelle, Savannah, and Jasmine (no longer working in the lab but still are great friends and vital to our success)]; middle panel- nothing more valuable than family, with my sisters (Tina and Kitty), and bottom left panel- my all-important golf buddies [Walter, Kim, Nigel (not pictured) and John].

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Panels above- undergraduate classes from SP ’16, FA’ 16 and SP ’17 inspire me every day to keep teaching and fuel my inner-core to keep going another year.

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Above panels- medical students (all 180 students/class) enrich my life and challenge me to keep working hard and stay happy.

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Besides attending a Parkinson’s Congress, getting certified in PWR!, publishing a book, and walking for Parkinson’s; it was all made easier by my PWR! Physical Therapist and gifted teacher Jennifer (top right panel), expert medical guidance from my Neurologist Dr. Roque (middle panel), Parkinson’s-education-awareness from the best movement disorder center social-worker Jessica (bottom middle panel), perpetual energy and role model of a PwP-advocate Lisa (bottom right panel), and Johanna and Katie (not pictured above) who make my day-job such a joyful experience.  And I apologize to many others who are not pictured here because you do really matter to me.

6 favorite cover photos from the past year (links to photos at the end):

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Thank you! Thank you for your support during the second year of my journey with this blog. As always, live decisively, be positive, stay focused, remain persistent and stay you.

“I want to be in the arena. I want to be brave with my life. And when we make the choice to dare greatly, we sign up to get our asses kicked. We can choose courage or we can choose comfort, but we can’t have both. Not at the same time. Vulnerability is not winning or losing; it’s having the courage to show up and be seen when we have no control over the outcome. Vulnerability is not weakness; it’s our greatest measure of courage.”  Brené Brown, Rising Strong

Noted added in proof: For a day or so, a preliminary version of this post appeared in 200 Years Ago James Parkinson published “An Essay On The Shaking Palsy” (click here to view).  Together, this combined post was substantially longer than my usual blog post.  Therefore, I separated them and decided to present this year-end-review in an expanded format.

Cover photo credit: farm4.staticflickr.com/3953/15575910318_ec35ebb523_b.jpg

Photo credits for the 6 favorite cover photos for 2016-2017: top left http://epod.usra.edu/.a/6a0105371bb32c970b015438c5312a970c-pi;  top right: : http://vb3lk7eb4t.search.serialssolutions.com/?V=1.0&L=VB3LK7EB4T&S=JCs&C=TC0001578421&T=marc ; middle left wallpaper-crocus-flower-buds-violet-primrose-snow-spring-flowers.jpg; middle right : http://az616578.vo.msecnd.net/files/2016/03/19/635940149667803087959444186_6359344127228967891155060939_nature-grass-flowers-spring-2780.jpg ; bottom left : http://www.beaconhouseinnb-b.com/wp-content/uploads/dawn-at-spring-lake-beach-bill-mckim.jpg ; bottom right : http://www.rarewallpapers.com/beaches/lifeguard-station-10678

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Parkinson’s Awareness Month: #EndParkinsons, World Parkinson Coalition, and Community Service

Inspirations knock and hang around for a while and wait for some kind of response, which is the beginning of a creative act.” Thomas Moore

“What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” Jane Goodal

Introduction: In 1980, a Dutch horticulturalist, J.W.S. Van der Wereld, honored Dr. James Parkinson by naming a tulip after him. Thus, the tulip is a symbol for Parkinson’s Disease.  April is dedicated as Parkinson’s Awareness Month. By reading this post and the many other Parkinson’s blogs/sites, we are joined together to promote awareness.  Thus, goals of the month include increasing knowledge about Parkinson’s and better appreciation of the disorder in the USA and around the world. The  specific goals of this post are (i) to describe the #EndParkinsons  campaign from the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF), (ii) the World Parkinson Coalition (WPC), and (iii) community  service.

“Do stuff. Be clenched, curious. Not waiting for inspiration’s shove or society’s kiss on your forehead. Pay attention. It’s all about paying attention. Attention is vitality. It connects you with others. It makes you eager. stay eager.” Susan Sontag

#EndParkinsons and Thunderclap: The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) is  promoting an interesting idea for awareness month, a thunderclap using the hashtag #EndParkinsons.Thunderclap is a tool that lets a message be heard when you and your friends say it together. Think of it as an ‘online flash mob.’ Join a Thunderclap, and you and others will share the same message at the same time, spreading an idea through Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr that cannot be ignored.” (https://www.thunderclap.it/faq)

The PDF campaign, which is based around social media status, is being programmed to go off on April 15 around the world spreading the news to cure Parkinson’s. Posting a message simultaneously should be a very notable event for Parkinson’s awareness.   And this message is being sent by everyone regardless of their status within the Parkinson’s community (i.e., people with Parkinson’s, family members, care givers, advocates, researchers, and health professionals). The second phase of this PDF campaign is to donate your social status profile using the same link below; this further highlights  your role in the Parkinson’s campaign. Can you imagine how powerful it will be as many different social accounts share the same message at the same moment. The PDF #EndParkinsons campaign can be accessed through the following URL:
https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/39404-endparkinsons?locale=en

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“For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you.” Neil deGrasse Tyson

World Parkinson Coalition (WPC):  The official mission statement is as follows: “The World Parkinson Coalition® is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing an international forum to learn about the latest scientific discoveries, medical practices, caregiver initiatives and advocacy work related to Parkinson’s disease. By bringing physicians, scientists, nurses, rehabilitation specialists, caregivers and people with Parkinson’s disease together, we hope to create a worldwide dialogue to help expedite the discovery of a cure and best treatment practices for this devastating disease.” (http://www.wpc2016.org/)   What is my interpretation of the WPC?   I see it in many different forms: first, as an avenue for providing information about Parkinson’s worldwide; second, as a key unifying forum for all of the Parkinson’s organizations; and third,  it epitomizes a ‘melting pot ‘ for all good things related to Parkinson’s.  Thousands of people will convene in Portland, Oregon this fall for the World Congress on Parkinson’s organized by the WPC.  I am very honored to be a part of the WPC as I was recently asked to join the Communications Committee  (http://www.wpc2016.org/?page=2016Communications&hhSearchTerms=%22communications%22).  I stand in awe of the amazing people of the Communications Committee; they are totally dedicated to Parkinson’s.   And I promised myself not to be a ‘poser’, and actually contribute as much as I can to this committee.

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“It’s hard to beat a person who never gives up.” Babe Ruth

 Community Service:  Last fall, my team and I participated in the Moving Day NC Triangle  walk for Parkinson’s. This year we walk again but I’ve been asked to join the planning committee. How could I say no to Jessie P: “I want to invite you to join our Planning Committee for the Moving Day® NC Triangle, the annual funds- and awareness-raising Parkinson’s walk! We need passionate and organized volunteers on this Committee who are dedicated to the cause of uniting the Parkinson’s community – and based on your efforts, I think you’d be a great addition!” It’s a real honor to be on the planning committee for Moving Day NC Triangle. I do look forward to the monthly meetings and the planning sessions;  I will do all I can to make the  2016 walk a success.
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“Live your truth. Express your love. Share your enthusiasm. Take action towards your dreams. Walk your talk. Dance and sing to your music. Embrace your blessings. Make today worth remembering.” Steve Maraboli

Nonprofit organizations: The goals of most disease-focused nonprofit organizations are relatively straightforward:  recruiting donations,  funding research, education/outreach/awareness, and enlisting volunteers to help promote the message and do the work. For over 20 years, I was involved with the American Heart Association (AHA) as a “volunteer”. My volunteer duties for the mid-Atlantic affiliate of the AHA  (with an annual budget of ~$50 million per year)  over the years consisted of being a grant reviewer, chair of a grant reviewing team, member of the research committee,  chair of the research committee, and finally, a member of the Board of Directors. The AHA is a well-respected organization because they do such a great job of getting the important message out to the public and they utilize a large amount of funds for research purposes.

Inspiration in Parkinson’s: Today, I am truly inspired by Parkinson’s. My new volunteer commitment is to Parkinson’s. My inspiration are the many people with Parkinson’s; I will work as hard as I can in this area for as long as I’m able.

“Don’t ever give up.
Don’t ever give in.
Don’t ever stop trying.
Don’t ever sell out.
And if you find yourself succumbing to one of the above for a brief moment,
pick yourself up, brush yourself off, whisper a prayer, and start where you left off.
But never, ever, ever give up.”
Richelle E. Goodrich

Cover photo credit: https://wallpaperscraft.com/image/tulips_flowers_close-up_sharpness_29510_3840x2160.jpg

Moving Day® was a Morning to Move for Parkinson’s and a Time to be Moved

“We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same.”  Carlos Castenada

“Don’t be ashamed of your story, it will inspire others.” Unknown

Background story: Over the years, my research career has been supported by various non-Federal organizations, in particular the American Heart Association (AHA) and Susan G. Komen for the Cure (Komen). Due to the generous funding of research projects and fellows by the AHA and Komen, my research group regularly participates in and raises funds for the annual Triangle Heart Walk and the Komen Triangle Race for the Cure®, respectively. 

What makes each of these such special annual events?  From my perspective, it is a combination of being around “survivors” (either heart disease or breast cancer), the camaraderie of the lab group participating together, and giving back to both organizations. However, my personal reasons for participating in these events are two-fold: first, to support the organizations that help fund my research; and second, to remember my parents (they died from cardiovascular issues) and to honor a sister (breast cancer survivor).

“Pain is inevitable, but misery is optional. We cannot avoid pain, but we can avoid joy.”  Tim Hansel

People who move can change the world: “Moving Day® is the National Parkinson Foundation’s annual fundraising walk/run event. It is a fun and inspiring fundraising event that unites families, friends and communities both large and small in the fight against Parkinson’s disease. This celebration of movement will feature a family friendly walk course, a kids area, a caregivers relaxation tent and a special Movement Pavilion featuring yoga, dance, Tai Chi, Pilates, etc. all proven to help manage the symptoms of PD. It will be ‘A day to move, a day to move others, a day that moves YOU!’.” [http://www.parkinson.org/get-involved/moving-day-walk-for-parkinsons]

Moving Day® NC Triangle was Saturday, October 31, 2015 at the Koka Booth Amphitheatre in Cary, NC.

“We have common enemies today. It’s called childhood poverty. It’s called cancer. It’s called AIDS. It’s called Parkinson’s. It’s called Muscular Dystrophy.” Jerry Doyle

Walking for Parkinson’s: Moving Day was a morning to move and a time to be moved: Unlike the AHA and Komen events described above, my participation in Moving Day was personal. I have Parkinson’s and I am trying hard to support numerous Parkinson’s organization, continue to stay focused on Parkinson’s advances, and remain committed to helping others with Parkinson’s through outreach/education/blog activities.  Thus, Moving Day was both important and very personal to me.

I did 3 things for Moving Day: (1) formed a ‘team’ named Carolina Parkinson’s; (2) wrote lots-and-lots of emails trying to raise awareness of Parkinson’s, and yes, solicited for donations (thanks to many friends, family members/loved ones, colleagues and students we reached our team fund-raising goal); and (3) recruited team members to walk with me. Below are photos of the team, team T-shirt and the walk.

IMG_7761IMG_7938 IMG_7939 IMG_7944 “All trials are not the reason to give up, but a challenge to improve ourselves. Our pain is not an excuse to back out, but an inspiration to move on.” Unknown

A walk and a moment of self-reflection:  Michael J. Fox once said, “Nobody would choose to have a disease visited upon them. Still, Parkinson’s forced me to make a fundamental life decision: adopt a siege mentality – or embark upon a life journey.”  Moving Day preparation went smoothly (fund raising, recruiting teammates to walk and the team T-shirts arrived in time).

The Day itself was inspiring; more than 1200 people and almost 90 teams participated.
The Day itself was simply a beautiful Carolina blue sky fall day.
The Day itself put me with a team of friends who came committed to recognizing Parkinson’s and to demonstrate their care for me; a moment in my life to remember, to cherish, to be thankful.
The Day itself was somewhat of an awakening; to walk next to 100’s of individuals with Parkinson’s and their army of supporters was both a joyous and sincere moment. Joyous because it was an event fueled by love and kindness. Sincere because it was a public day to reflect upon our disorder and to bring solidarity to acknowledge and support one another.
The Day itself was a 1st time for me as a participant with Parkinson’s; I missed some of the day’s events and opportunities to interact with my teammates and others (a poorly planned trip by me).

Thanks to everyone who donated to the team (both those who walked and those unable to be present) and thank you so very much for your constant support, friendship and love!  I have already begun planning for Moving Day 2016.

“The amount of new knowledge in the field of Parkinson’s disease gained in the past five years exceeds everything we knew from the previous 200 years” John Jurenko, healthcare research philanthropist who recently passed away after living with Parkinson’s