Category Archives: Parkinson Wellness Recovery

Part 1 of 2017 PWR! (Parkinson Wellness Recovery) Retreat: Pictures With Great Memories

“Just put one foot in front of the other.”  Austin Peck

“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.”  Henry Ford

Introduction to Part 1: From May 28-June 3, >100 people came to Scottsdale, Arizona for the PWR! Retreat. The final tally had >50 people-with-Parkinson’s, more than 30 care partners and ~20 physical therapists/fitness professionals, and PWR! Gym staff.

Simply stated,  participating in my first PWR! Retreat was life-altering, life-changing and possibly even life-saving. It will be hard to put into words what the week meant to me and  what it did for me.

I have decided to write 2 posts describing the PWR! Retreat,  Part 1 contains: (i) overview of week; (ii) instructors; (iii) impressions of format, instructors, teams, and location; and (iv) video presentation describing the entire week.

“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.”  Helen Keller

Video presentation describing the entire week:   I want to begin with the finale and show a video compiled to highlight the week of the PWR! Retreat. The vast majority of pictures shown in the video were either taken by or obtained from Claire McLean. A few things I want to highlight about the PWR! Retreat that you will see in the video include the following: a) it was a tremendous amount of fun; b) it was a lot of work physically because we exercised several hours every day; c) there was total camaraderie and synergy throughout the week; d)  every afternoon was spent being educated about Parkinson’s; e)  the physical therapists/fitness professionals that led our sessions were all outstanding people and really knew how to work well with everyone with Parkinson’s, and f)  the week revolved around the exercise program and philosophy created by Dr. Becky Farley  (Founder and CEO of Parkinson Wellness Recovery), and in reality, she was the reason we were all at the PWR! Retreat.

Assembling the pictures and putting it all together into the video format left me somewhat speechless. The video brought back so many wonderful memories of the interactions with everybody and it reminded me of the intensity of the exercise.  Watching the video allowed me to recall the sheer quality and quantity of the education  program presented, and it let me reminiscence about the sincerity and friendliness of everyone present.   It just felt like everyone wanted to be at the PWR! Retreat every single second of that week.

Video of 2017 PWR! Retreat: Pictures With Great Memories (to access the YouTube site, please click here).

“We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” Walt Disney

PWR! Retreat agenda and overview of the week (Click here to view Program ): There were basically two-sessions per day.  The morning always began for everyone with a PWR-Walk with poles at 6:30 AM, then breakfast and then separate programs for those of us with Parkinson’s (exercise) and Care Partners (a mixture of education sessions, group discussions and/or exercise), and sometimes we were combined together (which was always fun). Lunch was next.  The afternoon session was usually all-inclusive of participants and we listened to experts discuss many aspects of Parkinson’s, we had group discussions, and we had sessions of yoga, meditation, Tai Chi and other modalities (e.g., deep-brain stimulation surgery or DBS) used to treat Parkinson’s. The day usually ended at 5:30 PM and dinner was on our own.  Many came back after dinner to the game room, we had a dance night, I played golf on 4 different evenings, many of us returned to the resort bar/club to socialize and many people checked in early because an 11-hour day was incredibly fun but also it was tiring. All-in-all, the agenda was completell, well-rounded, and most enjoyable.  We were never bored.

“I find that the best way to do things is to constantly move forward and to never doubt anything and keep moving forward, if you make a mistake say you made a mistake.”  John Frusciante

PWR! Retreat instructors (brief biographies of the people who led our instructions; presented in alphabetical order after Dr. Farley):  To me, exercise  was the most important aspect of the retreat, followed by meeting everyone with Parkinson’s, and then equally important, the educational program.   Therefore, I want to present the physical therapists/fitness professionals, volunteers and staff that provided us our workout each day.  Each person was uniquely qualified; in my opinion, together as a team they have no equal. Here are a few comments about each one of the instructors.

•Dr. Becky Farley has a PhD in neuroscience from the University of Arizona, a Masters of science physical therapy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a bachelor of physical therapy from the University of Oklahoma.  During her post-doctorate, she developed the LSVT Big therapy program. Following this, she created the exercise program of PWR!Moves, opened the PWR! Gym that follows a philosophy centered on exercise is medicine and framework call PWR!4Life; in all this is contained within the nonprofit organization called Parkinson Wellness Recovery (PWR!).  The PWR! Retreat begins and ends with Dr. Farley; she’s clearly the heartbeat of why we were in Arizona.

•Dr. Jennifer Bazan-Wigle has her doctorate of physical therapy from Nova Southeastern University. She is an expert in treating individuals with Parkinson’s and various movement disorders and works at the PWR!Gym in Tucson, Arizona.  My history with Jennifer starts in 2016 when she was my instructor for PWR!Moves certification;  she was a motivated teacher, very knowledgeable about Parkinson’s and had intensity and the drive to really focus us to learn the material.  Jennifer is a role model for a physical therapist, and she is an amazing educator for working with those of us with Parkinson’s.

Jan Beyer completed her Masters in health education from Cortland state New York and started her own personal training business called “FitJan”.   She now lives and works in the Vancouver, Washington area where she’s working for the Quarry Senior living as the fitness director/Parkinson’s director.

Dr. Emily Borchers has her doctorate in physical therapy from Ohio State University and she currently works at the PWR!Gym.  Emily was very effective at sharing her expertise in helping teach all of the individuals with Parkinson’s.

Heleen Burghout has a Masters degree in physiotherapy from University of Amsterdam,  the Netherlands; and she has a primary care practice called ‘FhysioAlign’ in Ede,  the Netherlands. One of the main focuses of her practice is dealing with exercise and improving physical and mental conditions of people with Parkinson’s.

Dr. Valerie A. Carter has a doctorate in physical therapy from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff Arizona and is an associate clinical professor of physical therapy at Northern Arizona University.  She is certified and has taught workshops in both PWR! Moves and LSVT Big.  She owns and operates “Carter rehabilitation and wellness center and outpatient physical therapy clinic” in Flagstaff and she is an expert dealing with Parkinson’s patients.

Dr. Carl DeLuca has a doctorate in physical therapy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He works in Wisconsin Rapids Wisconsin and is focused on a patient population with outpatient orthopedic and neurological including people with Parkinson’s.  He is working to set up a central Wisconsin PT program for Parkinson’s.

Dr. Chelsea Duncan has a doctorate in physical therapy from University Southern California and works as an outpatient neurologic clinic that specializes in movement disorders. She focuses in teaching both one-on-one and group exercise classes  for people with Parkinson’s. And she does live in sunny Los Angeles California.

Marge Kinder has a degree in physical therapy from University of California, San Francisco and for more than 40 years has been practicing and treating neurological disorders.  She is the project coordinator for the Redmond Regional Medical Center in Rome Georgia.

Dr. Claire McLean  has a doctorate in physical therapy  from the University of Southern California and is an adjunct faculty member at both University of Southern California and California State University, Long Beach.  She has extensive training and is a board-certified neurologic clinical specialist and teaches both PWR! therapist and instructor courses. She has started a community wellness program for people with Parkinson’s and this is located in Southern California. My experience with Claire is that she was the voice and instructor for the videos that I use in my own training and for my undergraduate class in highlighting PWR! Moves.  Claire is an incredible PT/educator of exercise-and-life-programs for those of us with Parkinson’s.

Nancy Nelson is an ACE certified personal trainer and fitness specialist with over three decades of work experience in the health and wellness industry. She is an expert in dealing with exercise and Parkinson’s.

Sarah Krumme Palmer  has an MS degree in exercise physiology and have been working with patients with Parkinson’s for over 20 years. She is the owner of ‘forever fitness’ in Cincinnati Ohio. She is certified in PWR! moves professional, and has the Rock Steady Boxing affiliate in Cincinnati and has a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).

Kimberly Peute has an MBA from Webster University and is currently a JD candidate University of Arizona School of Law. She was an active participant in the PWR! retreat and was in charge of the care partner program.

•Lisa Robert has a physical therapy degree from the University of Alberta and Edmonton Alberta Canada and has been working in various settings including acute care, private practice and outpatient setting treating neurological patients.   Lisa has NDT, LSVT Big and PWR! Moves professional training experience, and she is a Master Trainer for urban poling. Lisa is also an excellent golfer; I had the opportunity and pleasure to play golf with her twice during the week of the PWR! Retreat.

•Ben Rossi has nearly 20 years of experience in fitness coaching, eight years dealing with the peak Parkinson’s community and as the founder of InMotion, he owns and operates ATP evolution performance training center.  Ben’s goal is straightforward in that he wants you in motion, helps you achieve a better eating program, encourages a positive attitude and he wants you to become 1% better every day.  He lives in Warrensville Heights Ohio.

Melinda Theobald has her MS degree in human movement from the A.T. Still University, Arizona School of Health Sciences, where she is certified by the National Academy sports medicine as corrective exercise specialist and a performance enhancement  specialist.  She currently works for Banner Neuro Wellness West in Sun City Arizona.

•Christy Tolman  has been a licensed realtor for over a decade and  served on the Parkinson’s network of Arizona at the Mohammad Ali Parkinson Center in Phoenix.  She was everything to the PWR! Retreat in terms of organizational skills;  in other words,  the PWR! Retreat was successful because of Christy’s effort.

“If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.”  Henry Ford

Impressions of format, instructors, teams, and location: 
Location– Scottsdale Resort in McCormick Ranch in Scottsdale Arizona was the ideal setting for the PWR! Retreat. The resort itself was well-kept and the rooms we used for the retreat were just right; the staff were helpful; it was adjacent to a golf course (great for me); many restaurants/shopping were only minutes away; and the food was just never-ending and really good quality.   I realize you can’t control the weather, but it was ideal sunny, hot and dry with clear skies.
Format–  the format was described above and it seemed ideal for the participants dealing with exercise in the morning and education in the afternoon with evenings free either to do things with your partner or with the group-at-large.
Instructors– They totally rocked!  I cannot imagine a better group of people to teach PWR! Moves and the other exercise (PWR-pole-walking, Circuit and Nexus) routines associated with the PWR! Retreat.  It was also so nice to see them outside of exercise; some gave talks in the afternoon sessions, we had meals together with them , and they were also active participants in all of our other events. 
Teams–   we had four different teams, my team was the Blue team  (For pole walking it was both the people with Parkinson’s and the care partners together, and for the exercise it was typically just the people with Parkinson’s together) and my group did the following sessions together as illustrated by the blue boxes in the table below.   I will describe the experience in more detail in my next post.  However, this was the vital experience that made the PWR! Retreat so valuable, spending time with these people the majority of whom had Parkinson’s (it was a special treat and honor to have the care partners with us for so much time as well because they were remarkable people themselves).

17.07.22.Group_Assignments

“Don’t dwell on what went wrong. / Instead, focus on what to do next. / Spend your energies on moving forward / toward finding the answer.” Denis Waitley

Pictures With Great Memories:  Below are posted many of the pictures that were contained in the video I showed in the beginning of the post. My second post I will spend more time talking about the exercise routines, education program, team camaraderie, and my personal feelings behind the week of exercise and everything else associated with the PWR! Retreat.   It’s very safe to say as I remarked at the beginning, the impact of  the PWR! Retreat on me was life altering and very meaningful in a profound manner.

My Team/Program Leaders (names of those missing from pictures are given in the video):

 The Team Leaders and Teams:

Exercise Routines (Pole walking, PWR! Moves, Nexus and Circuit):

 

Dance night, game night and meditation:

 

My Keynote presentation and additional ‘stuff’:

 

 

Additional photos of the PWR! Retreat instructors/organizers:
Screen Shot 2017-07-14 at 9.39.41 AMIMG_5228 (1)Golf fun:

 

Giving thanks and saying good-bye to all of the instructors:

 

 

“I do believe my life has no limits! I want you to feel the same way about your life, no matter what your challenges may be. As we begin our journey together, please take a moment to think about any limitations you’ve placed on your life or that you’ve allowed others to place on it. Now think about what it would be like to be free of those limitations. What would your life be if anything were possible?” Nick Vujicic

Cover photo credit:

http://www.genehanson.com/images/photography/777sunset/020_arizona_sunetset_image0001.jpg

 

 

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Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease Research and Discovery

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” Marcel Proust

“The process of scientific discovery is, in effect, a continual flight from wonder.” Albert Einstein

Preface:  Happy birthday to James Parkinson (neurologist, geologist, scientist, activist),  born April 11, 1755 and died December 21, 1824.  World Parkinson’s Day April 11, 2017.

Introduction to the historical timeline on Parkinson’s disease: This historical description of Parkinson’s is a joint venture/adventure between Frank and Simon . The idea for this project started as a conversation during a recent North Carolina beach weekend for Frank and Barbara: “Wouldn’t it be cool to publish a Parkinson’s historical timeline for Parkinson’s awareness month?” However, to complete this project I needed a Parkinson’s expert. As a follower of his outstanding blog ‘Science of Parkinson’s’, I approached Simon about helping out on this timeline project; and to my delight he said yes. Therefore, we are happy to present the milestones in Parkinson’s disease research and discovery. We do apologize to the clinicians, scientists, health-care specialists, and their projects that were not cited here but we limited the timeline to ~50 notations.

The entire historical timeline can be downloaded (click here for the PowerPoint file) and we encourage you to view it in ‘presentation’ mode. Each individual page of the timeline is presented below along with a brief explanation for each of the highlighted events. And Simon and I will be sharing the historical timeline in our own individual blogs.

“I want to see books taken out of historical time and placed into a different timeline, such as evolutionary or geological time, as a means of putting the human experience in context.” Douglas Coupland

1817-1919, Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease Research and Discovery (Part 1a: Historical):
Slide1

First description of Parkinson’s disease:
In 1811, Mr James Parkinson of no. 1 Hoxton Square (London) published a 66 page booklet called an ‘An Essay on the Shaking Palsy’. At the date of printing, it sold for 3 shillings (approx. £9 or US$12). The booklet was the first complete description of a condition that James called ‘Paralysis agitans’ or shaking palsy. In his booklet, he discusses the history of tremor and distinguishes this new condition from other diseases. He then describes three of his own patients and three people who he saw in the street.

The naming of Parkinson’s disease:
Widely considered the ‘Father of modern neurology’, the importance of Jean-Martin Charcot’s contribution to modern medicine is rarely in doubt. From Sigmund Freud to William James (one of the founding fathers of Psychology), Charcot taught many of the great names in the early field of neurology. Between 1868 and 1881, Charcot focused much of his attention on the ‘paralysis agitans’. Charcot rejected the label ‘Paralysis agitans’, however, suggesting that it was misleading in that patients were not markedly weak and do not necessarily have tremor. Rather than Paralysis Agitans, Charcot suggested that Maladie de Parkinson (or Parkinson’s disease) would be a more appropriate name, bestowing credit to the man who first described the condition. And thus 70 years after passing away, James Parkinson was immortalized with the disease named after him.

The further clinical characterization of Parkinson’s disease:
British neurologist Sir William Gowers published a two-volume text called the Manual of Diseases of the Nervous System (1886, 1888). In this book he described his personal experience with 80 people with Parkinson’s disease in the 1880s. He also identified the subtle male predominance of the disorder and provided illustrations of the characteristic posture. In his treatment of Parkinson’s tremor, Gower used hyoscyamine, hemlock, and hemp (cannabis) as effective agents for temporary tremor abatement.

The discovery of the chemical dopamine:
In the Parkinsonian brain there is a severe reduction in the chemical dopamine. This chemical was first synthesized in 1910 by George Barger and James Ewens at the Wellcome labs in London, England.

The discovery of Lewy bodies:
One of the cardinal features of Parkinson’s disease in the brain is the presence of Lewy bodies – circular clusters of protein. In 1912, German neurologist Friedrich Lewy, just two years out of medical school and still in his first year as Director of the Neuropsychiatric Laboratory at the University of Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland) Medical School discovered these ‘spherical inclusions’ in the brains of a people who had died with Parkinson’s disease.

The importance of the substantia nigra in Parkinson’s disease:
The first brain structure to be associated with Parkinson’s disease was the substantia nigra. This region lies in an area called the midbrain and contains the majority of the dopamine neurons in the human brain. It was in 1919 that a Russian graduate student working in Paris, named Konstantin Tretiakofirst demonstrated that the substantia nigra was associated with Parkinson’s disease. Tretiakoff also noticed circular clusters in the brains he examined and named them ‘corps de Lewy’ (or Lewy bodies) after the German neurologist Friedrich Lewy who first discovered them.

“Everyone wants answers and wants to know what the timeline is. Unfortunately, it’s a complex situation, and we don’t have the final answers yet.” Dennis Miller

1953-1968, Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease Research and Discovery (Part 1b: Historical):

Slide2

The first complete pathologic analysis of the Parkinsonian brain:
The most complete pathologic analysis of Parkinson’s disease with a description of the main sites of damage was performed in 1953 by Joseph Godwin Greenfield and Frances Bosanquet.

The discovery of a functional role for dopamine in the brain:
Until the late 1950s, the chemical dopamine was widely considered an intermediate in the production of another chemical called norepinephrine. That is to say, it had no function and was simply an ingredient in the recipe for norepinephrine. Then in 1958, Swedish scientist Arvid Carlsson discovered that dopamine acts as a neurotransmitter – a discovery that won Carlsson the 2000 Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine.

The founding of the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation:
In 1957, a nonprofit organization called the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation was founded by William Black. It was committed to finding a cure for Parkinson’s Disease. Since its founding in 1957, PDF has funded more than $115 million worth of scientific research in Parkinson’s disease. The National Parkinson Foundation (NPF), was also founded in 1957 by Jeanne C. Levey. NPF is a national organization whose mission is to make life better for people with Parkinson’s through expert care and research. The foundation has funded more than $208 million in care, research and support services.

The discovery of the loss of dopamine in the brain of people with Parkinson’s disease:  In 1960, Herbert Ehringer and Oleh Hornykiewicz demonstrated that the chemical dopamine was severely reduced in brains of people who had died with Parkinson’s disease.

The first clinical trials of Levodopa:
Knowing that dopamine can not enter the brain and armed with the knowledge that the chemical L-dopa was the natural ingredient in the preoduction of dopamine, Oleh Hornykiewicz & Walther Birkmayer began injecting people with Parkinson’s disease with L-dopa in 1961. The short term response to the drug was dramatic: “Bed-ridden patients who were unable to sit up, patients who could not stand up when seated, and patients who when standing could not start walking performed all these activities with ease after L-dopa. They walked around with normal associated movements and they could even run and jump.” (Birkmayer and Hornykiewicz 1961).

The first internationally-used rating system for Parkinson’s disease:
In 1967, Melvin Yahr and Margaret Hoehn published a rating system for Parkinson’s disease in the journal Neurology. It involves 5 stages, ranging from unilateral symptoms but no functional disability (stage 1) to confinement to wheel chair (stage 5). Since then, a modified Hoehn and Yahr scale has been proposed with the addition of stages 1.5 and 2.5 in order to help better describe the intermediate periods of the disease.

Perfecting the use of L-dopa as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease:
In 1968, Greek-American scientist George Cotzias reported dramatic effects on people with Parkinson’s disease using oral L-dopa. The results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. and L-dopa becomes a therapeutic reality with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approving the drug for use in Parkinson’s disease in 1970. Cotzias and his colleagues were also the first to describe L-dopa–induced dyskinesias.

“Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.” Marie Curie

1972-1997, Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease Research and Discovery (Part 1c: Historical):

Levodopa + AADC inhibitors (carbidopa or benserazide:
 When given alone levodopa is broken down to dopamine in the bloodstream, which leads to some detrimental side effects.  By including an aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) inhibitor with levodopa allows the levodopa to get to the blood-brain barrier in greater amounts for better utilization by the neurons. In the U.S., the AADC inhibitor of choice is carbidopa and in other countries it’s benserazide.

The discovery of dopamine agonists:
Dopamine agonists are ‘mimics’ of dopamine that pass through the blood brain barrier to interact with target dopamine receptors. Since the mid-1970’s, dopamine agonists are often the first medication given most people to treat their Parkinson’s; furthermore, they can be used in conjunction with levodopa/carbidopa. The most commonly prescribed dopamine agonists in the U.S. are Ropinirole (Requip®), Pramipexole (Mirapex®), and Rotigotine (Neupro® patch). There are some challenging side effects of dopamine agonists including compulsive behavior (e.g., gambling and hypersexuality),  orthostatic hypotension, and hallucination.

The clinical use of MAO-B inhibitors:
In the late-1970’s, monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitors were created to block an enzyme in the brain that breaks down levodopa. MAO-B inhibitors have a modest effect in suppressing the symptoms of Parkinson’s.  Thus, one of the functions of MAO-B inhibitors is to prolong the half-life of levodopa to facilitate its use in the brain.  Very recently in clinical trials, it’s been shown that MAO-B inhibitors have some neuroprotective effect when used long-term.  The most widely used MAO-B inhibitors in the U.S. include Rasagiline (Azilect®) and Selegiline (Eldepryl® and Zelpar®); MAO-B inhibitors may reduce “off” time and extend “on” time of levodopa.

Fetal Cell transplantation:
After successful preclinical experiments in rodents, a team of researchers in Sweden, led by Anders Bjorklund and Olle Lindvall, began the first clinical trials of fetal cell transplantation for Parkinson’s disease. These studies involved taking embryonic dopamine cells and injecting them into the brains of people with Parkinson’s disease. The cells then matured and replaced the cells that had been lost during the progression of the disease.

The discovery of MPTP:
In July of 1982, Dr. J. William Langston of the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose (California) was confronted with a group of heroin addicts who were completely immobile. A quick investigation demonstrated that the ‘frozen addicts’ had injected themselves with a synthetic heroin that had not been prepared correctly. The heroin contained a chemical called MPTP, which when injected into the body rapidly kills dopamine cells. This discovery provided the research community with a new tool for modeling Parkinson’s disease.

LSVT LOUD®:
LSVT stands for Lee Silverman Voice Treatment for use by speech pathologists; she was the first patient treated by this innovative therapeutic technique in 1985.   LSVT LOUD® was one of the first treatment strategies used for boosting the voice and sound levels of patients with Parkinson’s.   It is set up to be one hour per day for four days per week for four weeks of treatment, and it’s typically very effective in boosting volume and clarity of someone’s voice. LSVT LOUD® led to LSVT BIG®, developed by Dr. Becky Farley and others and it focused on improving movement, mobility, stiffness and stability in Parkinson’s.

Deep-brain stimulation (DBS) surgery becomes a treatment for Parkinson’s disease:
DBS is a surgical procedure used to treat some of the disabling neurological symptoms of Parkinson’s when drug therapy has failed to help the patient’s tremor, rigidity, stiffness, slowed movement, and walking problems.  There are three components in DBS surgery, the electrode, the extension from the electrode to the neurostimulator, which is also called the battery pack. The subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus are FDA-approved target sites in the brain for stimulation by the electrode. Although most patients still need to take medication after DBS, many patients experience considerable reduction of their  symptoms and are able to greatly reduce their medications.

“Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere.” Carl Sagan

1997-2006, Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease Research and Discovery (Part 1d: Historical):

Slide4

Alpha synuclein becomes the first gene associated with familial cases of Parkinson’s disease and its protein is found in Lewy bodies:
In 1997, a group of researchers at the National institute of Health led by Robert Nussbaum reported the first genetic aberration linked to Parkinson’s disease. They had analyzed DNA from a large Italian family and some Greek familial cases of Parkinson’s disease.

The gene Parkin becomes the first gene associated with juvenile Parkinson’s disease:
The gene Parkin provides the instructions for producing a protein that is involved with removing rubbish from within a cell. In 1998, a group of Japanese scientists identified mutations in this gene that resulted in affected individuals being vulnerable to developing a very young onset (juvenile) version of Parkinson’s disease.

The first use of PET scan brain imaging for Parkinson’s disease:
Using the injection of a small amount of radioactive material (known as a tracer), the level of dopamine present in an area of the brain called the striatum could be determined in a live human being. Given that amount of dopamine in the striatum decreases over time in Parkinson’s disease, this method of brain scanning represented a useful diagnostic aid and method of potentially tracking the condition.

The launch of Michael J Fox Foundation:
In 1991, actor Michael J Fox was diagnosed with young-onset Parkinson’s disease at 29 years of age. Upon disclosing his condition in 1998, he committed himself to the campaign for increased Parkinson’s research. Founded on the 31st October, 2000, the Michael J Fox Foundation has funded more than $700 million in Parkinson’s disease research, representing one of the largest non-governmental sources of funding for Parkinson’s disease.

The Braak Staging of Parkinson’s pathology:
In 2003, German neuroanatomist Heiko Braak and colleagues presented a new theory of how Parkinson’s disease spreads based on the post mortem analysis of hundreds of brains from people who had died with Parkinson’s disease. Braak proposed a 6 stage theory, involving the disease spreading from the brain stem (at the top of the spinal cord) up into the brain and finally into the cortex.

The gene DJ1 is linked to early onset PD:
DJ1 (also known as PARK7) is a protein that inhibits the aggregation of Parkinson’s disease-associated protein alpha synuclein. In 2003, researchers discovered mutations in the DJ1 gene that made people vulnerable to a early-onset form of Parkinson’s disease.

The first GDNF clinical trial indicates neuroprotection in people with Parkinson’s disease:
A small open-label clinical study involving the direct delivery of the chemical Glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) into the brains of people with Parkinson’s disease indicated that neuroprotection. The subjects involved in the study exhibited positive responses to the treatment and postmortem analysis of one subjects brain indicated improvements in the brain.

The genes Pink1 and LRRK2 are associated with early onset PD:
Early onset Parkinson’s is defined by age of onset between 20 and 40 years of age, and it accounts for <10% of all patients with Parkinson’s.  Genetic studies are finding a causal association for Parkinson’s with five genes: α-synuclein (SNCA), parkin (PARK2), PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), DJ-1 (PARK7), and Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). However it happens, and at whatever age it occurs, there is no doubt that genetics and environment combine together to contribute to the development of Parkinson’s.

The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells:
In 2006, Japanese researchers demonstrated that it was possible to take skin cells and genetically reverse engineer them into a more primitive state – similar to that of a stem cell. This amazing achievement involved a fully mature cell being taken back to a more immature state, allowing it to be subsequently differentiated into any type of cell. This research resulted in the discoverer, Shinya Yamanaka being awarded the 2012 Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine.

“Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life.” Immanuel Kant

2007-2016, Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease Research and Discovery (Part 1e: Historical):

Slide5

The introduction of the MDS-UPDRS revised rating scale:
The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale (UPDRS) was introduced in 2007 to address two limitations of the previous scaling system, namely a lack of consistency among subscales and the low emphasis on the nonmotor features. It is now the most commonly used scale in the clinical study of Parkinson’s disease.

The discovery of Lewy bodies in transplanted dopamine cells:
Postmortem analysis of the brains of people with Parkinson’s disease who had fetal cell transplantation surgery in the 1980-1990s demonstrated that Lewy bodies are present in the transplanted dopamine cells. This discovery (made by three independent research groups) suggests that Parkinson’s disease can spread from unhealthy cells to healthy cells. This finding indicates a ‘prion-like’ spread of the condition.

SNCA, MAPT and LRRK2 are risk genes for idiopathic Parkinson’s disease:
Our understanding of the genetics of Parkinson’s is rapidly expanding. There is recent evidence of multiple genes linked to an increase the risk of idiopathic Parkinson’s. Interestingly, microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is involved in microtubule assembly and stabilization, and it can complex with alpha-synuclein (SNCA).  Future therapies are focusing on  the reduction and clearance of alpha-synuclein and inhibition of Lrrk2 kinase activity.

 IPS derived dopamine neurons from people with Parkinson’s disease:
The ability to generate dopamine cells from skin cells derived from a person with Parkinson’s disease represents not only a tremendous research tool, but also opens the door to more personalized treatments of suffers. Induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells have opened new doors for researchers and now that we can generate dopamine cells from people with Parkinson’s disease exciting opportunities are suddenly possible.

Neuroprotective effect of exercise in rodent Parkinson’s disease models:
Exercise has been shown to be both neuroprotective and neurorestorative in animal models of Parkinson’s. Exercise promotes an anti-inflammatory microenvironment in the mouse/rat brain (this is but one example of the physiological influence of exercise in the brain), which helps to reduce dopaminergic cell death.  Taking note of these extensive and convincing model system results, many human studies studying exercise in Parkinson’s are now also finding positive benefits from strenuous and regular exercise to better manage the complications of Parkinson’s.

Transeuro cell transplantation trial begins:
In 2010, a European research consortium began a clinical study with the principal objective of developing an efficient and safe treatment methodology fetal cell transplantation in people with Parkinson’s disease. The trial is ongoing and the subjects will be followed up long term to determine if the transplantation can slow or reverse the features of Parkinson’s disease.

Successful preclinical testing of dopamine neurons from embryonic stem cells:
Scientists in Sweden and New York have successfully generated dopamine neurons from human embryonic stem cells that can be successfully transplanted into animal models of Parkinson’s disease. Not only do the cells survive, but they also correct the motor deficits that the animals exhibit. Efforts are now being made to begin clinical trials in 2018.

Microbiome of the gut influences Parkinson’s disease:
Several research groups have found the Parkinson’s disease-associated protein alpha synuclein in the lining of the gut, suggesting that the intestinal system may be one of the starting points for Parkinson’s disease. In 2016, researchers found that the bacteria in the stomachs of people with Parkinson’s disease is different to normal healthy individuals. In addition, experiments in mice indicated that the bacteria in the gut can influence the healthy of the brain, providing further evidence supporting a role for the gut in the development of Parkinson’s disease.

“Any fool can know. The point is to understand.” Albert Einstein

2016-2017, Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease Research and Discovery (Part 2: Clinical trials either recently completed or in progress)

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Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy Assessment of Dynacirc (Isradipine) for PD (STEADY-PD) III trial:
Isradipine is a calcium-channel blocker approved for  treating high blood pressure; however, Isradipine is not approved for treating Parkinson’s. In animal models, Isradipine has been shown to slow the progression of PD by protecting dopaminergic neurons.  This study is enrolling newly diagnosed PD patients not yet in need of symptomatic therapy. Participants will be randomly assigned Isradipine or given a placebo.

Treatment of Parkinson’s Psychosis with Nuplazid:~50% of the people with Parkinson’s develop psychotic tendencies. Treatment of their psychosis can be relatively difficult. However, a new drug named Nuplazid™ was recently approved by the FDA specifically designed to treat Parkinson’s psychosis.

Opicapone (COMT Inhibitor) as Adjunct to Levodopa Therapy in Patients With Parkinson Disease and Motor Fluctuations:
Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitors prolong the effect of levodopa by blocking its metabolism. COMT inhibitors are used primarily to help with the problem of the ‘wearing-off’ phenomenon associated with levodopa. Opicapone is a novel, once-daily, potent third-generation COMT inhibitor.  It appears to be safer than existing COMT drugs. If approved by the FDA, Opicapone is planned for use in patients with Parkinson’s taking with levodopa who experience wearing-off issues.

Nilotinib (Tasigna® by Novartis) indicates positive results in phase I trial:
Nilotinib is a drug used in the treatment of leukemia. In 2015, it demonstrated beneficial effects in a small phase I clinical trial of Parkinson’s disease. Researchers believe that the drug activates the disposal system of cells, thereby helping to make cells healthier. A phase II trial of this drug to determine how effective it is in Parkinson’s disease is now underway.

ISCO cell transplantation trial begins:
International Stem Cell Corporation is currently conducting a phase I clinical cell transplantation trial at a hospital in Melbourne, Australia. The company is transplanting human parthenogenetic stem cells-derived neural stem cells into the brains of people with Parkinson’s disease. The participants will be assessed over 12 months to determine whether the cells are safe for use in humans.

Neuropore’s alpha-synuclein stabilizer (NPT200-11) passes phase I trial:
Neuropore Therapies is a biotech company testing a compound (NPT200-11) that inhibits and stablises the activity of the Parkinson’s disease-associated protein alpha synuclein. This alpha-synuclein inhibitor has been shown to be safe and well tolerated in humans in a phase I clinical trial and the company is now developing a phase II trial.

mGluR4 PAM  (PXT002331) well tolerated in phase I trial:
Prexton Therapeutics recently announced positive phase I clinical trial results for their lead drug, PXT002331, which is the first drug of its kind to be tested in Parkinson’s disease. PXT002331 is a mGluR4 PAM – this is a class of drug that reduces the level of inhibition in the brain. In Parkinson’s disease there is an increase in inhibition in the brain, resulting in difficulties with initiating movements. Phase II clinical trials to determine efficacy are now underway.

Initial results of Bristol GDNF trial indicate no effect:
Following remarkable results in a small phase I clinical study, the recent history of the neuroprotective chemical GDNF has been less than stellar. A subsequent phase II trial demonstrated no difference between GDNF and a placebo control, and now a second phase II trial in the UK city of Bristol has reported initial results also indicating no effect. Given the initial excitement that surrounded GDNF, this result has been difficult to digest. Additional drugs that behave in a similar fashion to GDNF are now being tested in the clinic.

Immunotherapies proves safe in phase I trials (AFFiRis & Prothena):
Immunotherapy is a treatment approach which strengthens the body’s own immune system. Several companies (particularly ‘AFFiRis’ in Austria and ‘Prothena’ in the USA) are now conducting clinical trials using treatments that encourage the immune system to target the Parkinson’s disease-associated protein alpha synuclein. Both companies have reported positive phase I results indicating the treatments are well tolerable in humans, and phase II trials are now underway.

Living Cell Technologies Limited continue Phase II trial of NTCELLA New Zealand company called Living Cell Technologies Limited have been given permission to continue their phase II clincial trial of their product NTCELL, which is a tiny capsule that contains cells which release supportive nutrients when implanted in the brain. The implanted participants will be blindly assessed for 26 weeks, and if the study is successful, the company will “apply for provisional consent to treat paying patients in New Zealand…in 2017”.

MAO-B inhibitors shown to be neuroprotective:
MAO-B inhibitors block/slow the break down of the chemical dopamine. Their use in Parkinson’s disease allows for more dopamine to be present in the brain. Recently, several longitudinal studies have indicated that this class of drugs may also be having a neuroprotective effect.

Inhalable form of L-dopa:
Many people with Parkinson’s disease have issues with swallowing. This makes taking their medication in pill form problematic. Luckily, a new inhalable form of L-dopa will shortly become available following recent positive Phase III clinical trial results, which demonstrated a statistically significant improvements in motor function for people with Parkinson’s disease during OFF periods.

Exenatide trial results expected:
Exenatide is a drug that is used in the treatment of diabetes. It has also demonstrated beneficial effects in preclinical models of Parkinson’s disease, as well as an open-label clinical study over a 14 month period. Interestingly, in a two year follow-up study of that clinical trial – conducted 12 months after the patients stopped receiving Exenatide – the researchers found that patients previously exposed to Exenatide demonstrated significant improvements compared to how they were at the start of the study. There is currently a placebo-controlled, double blind phase II clinical trial being conducted and the results should be reported before the end of 2017.

“This is where it all begins. Everything starts here, today.” David Nicholls

A personal reflection:
In my adult life as a scientist, I’ve studied the world of hematology and how your blood clots.   And as a lifelong medical educator, I’ve taught the principles of biomedical science/hematology/oncology/immunology.   But this thing with Parkinson’s,  this for the rest of your life disorder is still relatively new in my life-line. Making this historical timeline was very educational for me; I learned a tremendous amount of information about this disease.  This timeline would not exist without the help and guidance of Simon my friend in Cambridge, England. He has his own blog entitled the Science of Parkinson’s.  Simon went out of his way to help plan and expedite this calendar of Parkinson’s history; I am most thankful for his participation.

“I’m going to be totally honest with you. Dealing with a diagnosis of Parkinson’s is not easy and there is no one, single technique that will ease the pain and no magic pill that will miraculously enable you to cope with it. However … I sincerely hope that you are able to come to terms with the diagnosis and perhaps even come to view it as a positive life-changing experience.” John Baxter

Cover photo credit: http://www.hoasaigon.com.vn/kcfinder/upload/images/tu-van-tang-hoa-chuc-mung-ngay-10-10-cho-nhung-nguoi-phu-nu-than-yeu-14.jp

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9 Things to Know About Exercise-induced Neuroplasticity in Human Parkinson’s

“A willing mind makes a hard journey easy.” Philip Massinger

“Lack of activity destroys the good condition of every human being.” Plato

Introduction: Much of my life has been spent exercising. Most of this exercise has been done with sheer delight.  Since receiving my Parkinson’s diagnosis, my opinion of exercise has changed.  With Parkinson’s, I’m now exercising as if my life depends on it.  Why?  Animal models (mouse and rat) of Parkinson’s have convincing shown the effect of exercise-induced neuroplasticity.  These animal studies demonstrated neuroprotection and even neurorestoration of Parkinson’s.  But we’re neither mice/rats nor are we an animal model of Parkinson’s disease; thus, this post is an update on exercise-induced neuroplasticity in human Parkinson’s.

“If you don’t do what’s best for your body, you’re the one who comes up on the short end.” Julius Erving

cartoon-brain-exercise

9 Things to Know About Exercise-induced Neuroplasticity in Human Parkinson’s: Neuroplasticity,  neuroprotection and neurorestoration are catchy words that populate a lot of publications, blogs from many of us with Parkinson’s and from professionals who study/work in the field of Parkinson’s.  It is important for you to develop your own opinion about exercise-induced neuroplasticity. My goal in this post is to provide the basic elements, concepts and key reference material to help you with this opinion. Here is a 1-page summary of “9 Things to Know About Exercise-induced Neuroplasticity in Human Parkinson’s” (click here to download page).

9_things_exercise_neuroplasticity_parkinsons

(1) Parkinson’s Disease (PD): Parkinson’s is a neurodegenerative disorder. Parkinson’s usually presents as a movement disorder, which is a slow progressive loss of motor coordination, gait disturbance, slowness of movement, rigidity, and tremor.  Parkinson’s can also include cognitive/psychological impairments. ~170 people/day are diagnosed with Parkinson’s in the USA; the average age of onset is ~60 years-old.

(2) Safety First: The benefit of an exercise routine/program will only work if you have (i) talked about it with your Neurologist and have his/her consent; (ii) you have received advice from a physical therapist/certified personal trainer about which exercises are ‘best’ for you; and (iii) you recognize that PD usually comes with gait and balance issues, and you are ready to begin. Safety first, always stay safe!

(3) Exercise: Exercise is activity requiring physical effort, carried out especially to sustain or improve health and fitness. Exercise is viewed by movement disorders clinicians, physical therapists, and certified personal trainers as a key medicinal ingredient in both treating and enabling patients at all stages of Parkinson’s.

(4) Brain Health: With or without Parkinson’s disease, taking care of your brain is all-important to your overall well-being, life-attitude, and health. For a balanced-healthy brain, strive for: proper nutrition and be cognitively fit; exercise; reduce stress; work and be mentally alert; practice mindfulness/meditation; sleep; and stay positive.

(5) Neuroplasticity: Neuroplasticity describes how neurons in the brain compensate for injury/disease and adjust their actions in response to environmental changes. “Forced-use exercise” of the more affected limb/side can be effective in driving neural network adaptation.  Ultimately, this can lead to improved function of the limb/side.

(6) Synapses are junctions between two nerve cells whereby neurotransmitters diffuse across small gaps to transmit and receive signals.

(7) Circuitry: A key result of neuroplasticity is the re-routing of neuronal pathways of the brain along which electrical and chemical signals travel in the central nervous system (CNS).

(8) Parkinson’s-specific Exercise Programs:
PWR!Moves (click here to learn more)
Rock Steady Boxing (click here to learn more)
LSVT BIG (click here to learn more)
Dance for PD (click here to learn more)
LIM Yoga (click here to learn more)
Tai Chi for PD (click here to learn more)

What types of exercise are best for people with Parkinson’s disease? Here is a nice overview of the benefits of exercise for those of us with Parkinson’s  (click here). Regarding the PD-specific exercise programs,  I am most familiar with PWR!Moves, Rock Steady Boxing and LSVT BIG (I’m certified to teach PWR!Moves, I’m a graduate of LSVT BIG, and I’ve participated in Rock Steady Boxing). A goal for you is to re-read ‘Safety First’ above and begin to decide which type of exercise you’d benefit from and would enjoy the most.

(9) Brain/Behavior Changes: The collective results found increase in corticomotor excitability, increase in brain grey matter volume, increase in serum BDNF levels, and decrease in serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels. These results imply that neuroplasticity from exercise may potentially either slow or halt progression of Parkinson’s.

What the terms mean: Corticomotor describes motor functions controlled by the cerebral cortex (people with Parkinson’s show reduced corticomotor excitability). Brain grey matter is a major component of the central nervous system consisting of neuronal cells, myelinated and unmyelinated axons, microglial cells, synapses, and capillaries. BDNF is brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is a protein involved in brain plasticity and it is important for survival of dopaminergic neurons. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) is an inflammatory cytokine (protein) that is involved in systemic inflammation.  Some studies of exercise-induced neuroplasticity in human Parkinson’s found the above-mentioned changes, which would imply a positive impact of exercise to promote neuroplastic changes.

What can you do with all of the cited articles listed at the end? Compiled below are some comprehensive and outstanding reviews about exercise-induced neuroplasticity in Parkinson’s.  Looking through these papers, you’ll see years of work, but this work has all of the details to everything I’ve described.

“All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

What I believe about neuroplasticity and exercise in Parkinson’s: [Please remember I am not a physician; definitely talk with your neurologist before beginning any exercise program.]  I think about exercising each day; I try to do it on a daily basis.  As a scientist, I’m impressed by the rodent Parkinson’s data and how exercise promotes neuroplasticity. The human studies are also believable; sustained aerobic exercise induces neuroplasticity to improve overall brain health. “Forced-use exercise” is an important concept; I try to work my right-side (arm and leg), which are slightly weaker and stiffer from Parkinson’s. Initially, I used my left arm more, now I ‘force’ myself on both sides with the hope my neural network is stabilized or even improving. If you enjoy exercising as I do, I view it as both an event and a reward; ultimately, I believe it can work and improve my response to Parkinson’s. If you don’t enjoy exercising, this may be more of a task and duty; however, the benefits over time can be better health. Exercise is good for you (heart and brain).  Begin slow, make progress, and see if you are living better with your disorder.  Remain hopeful and be both persistent and positive; try to enjoy your exercise.

“I am not afraid of storms for I am learning how to sail my ship.” Louisa May Alcott

Past blog posts: Both exercise itself and the benefit of exercise-induced neuroplasticity have been common themes for this blog, including (click on title to view blog posting):
Believe in Life in the Presence of Parkinson’s;
Déjà Vu and Neuroplasticity in Parkinson’s;
Golf And Parkinson’s: A Game For Life;
The Evolving Portrait of Parkinson’s;
Believe In Big Movements Of LSVT BIG Physical Therapy For Parkinson’s;
Meditation, Yoga, and Exercise in Parkinson’s;
Exercise and Parkinson’s.

“Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.” John Wooden

References on neuroplasticity and exercise in Parkinson’s:
Farley, B. G. and G. F. Koshland (2005). “Training BIG to move faster: the application of the speed-amplitude relation as a rehabilitation strategy for people with Parkinson’s disease.” Exp Brain Res 167(3): 462-467 (click here to view paper).

Fisher, B. E., et al. (2008). “The effect of exercise training in improving motor performance and corticomotor excitability in people with early Parkinson’s disease.” Arch Phys Med Rehabil 89(7): 1221-1229 (click here to view paper).

Hirsch, M. A. and B. G. Farley (2009). “Exercise and neuroplasticity in persons living with Parkinson’s disease.” Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 45(2): 215-229 (click here to view paper).

Petzinger, G. M., et al. (2010). “Enhancing neuroplasticity in the basal ganglia: the role of exercise in Parkinson’s disease.” Mov Disord 25 Suppl 1: S141-145 (click here to view paper).

Bassuk, S. S., et al. (2013). “Why Exercise Works Magic.” Scientific American 309(2): 74-79.

Lima, L. O., et al. (2013). “Progressive resistance exercise improves strength and physical performance in people with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review.” Journal of Physiotherapy 59(1): 7-13 (click here to view paper).

Petzinger, G. M., et al. (2013). “Exercise-enhanced neuroplasticity targeting motor and cognitive circuitry in Parkinson’s disease.” Lancet Neurol 12(7): 716-726 (click here to view paper)..

Ebersbach, G., et al. (2015). “Amplitude-oriented exercise in Parkinson’s disease: a randomized study comparing LSVT-BIG and a short training protocol.” J Neural Transm (Vienna) 122(2): 253-256 (click here to view paper).

Petzinger, G. M., et al. (2015). “The Effects of Exercise on Dopamine Neurotransmission in Parkinson’s Disease: Targeting Neuroplasticity to Modulate Basal Ganglia Circuitry.” Brain Plast 1(1): 29-39 (click here to view paper).

Abbruzzese, G., et al. (2016). “Rehabilitation for Parkinson’s disease: Current outlook and future challenges.” Parkinsonism Relat Disord 22 Suppl 1: S60-64 (click here to view paper).

Hirsch, M. A., et al. (2016). “Exercise-induced neuroplasticity in human Parkinson’s disease: What is the evidence telling us?” Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 22, Supplement 1: S78-S81 (click here to view paper)

Tessitore, A., et al. (2016). “Structural connectivity in Parkinson’s disease.” Parkinsonism Relat Disord 22 Suppl 1: S56-59 (click here to view paper).

“If we could give every individual the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health.” Hippocrates

“Life is complex. Each one of us must make his own path through life. There are no self-help manuals, no formulas, no easy answers. The right road for one is the wrong road for another…The journey of life is not paved in blacktop; it is not brightly lit, and it has no road signs. It is a rocky path through the wilderness.” M. Scott Peck

Cover photo credit: http://paper4pc.com/free-seascape.html#gal_post_55564_free-seascape-wallpaper-1.jpg

Brain exercising cartoon: http://tactustherapy.com/neuroplasticity-stroke-survivors/

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Believe in Life in the Presence of Parkinson’s

“Life is not only merriment, it is desire and determination.” Kahlil Gibran

“Nothing will work unless you do.” Maya Angelou

Dedication: I recently participated in a Parkinson Wellness Recovery (PWR!) Instructor Workshop in Greenville, SC (July 30-31, 2016); now I am certified in PWR!Moves.  This post is dedicated to the workshop instructor Jennifer Bazan-Wigle; and to my classmates, all of the personal trainers interested in working with Parkinson’s disease patients.  Jennifer was simply a great instructor, with a real understanding of Parkinson’s and a true ability to ‘teach’.  The personal trainers who participated were very dedicated in their effort to master PWR!Moves and their willingness to instruct me during the weekend workshop made for a memorable experience.  And not to forget Steve Miller, a PWR!Moves instructor, who also helped teach; you were the inspiration that led me to apply for this workshop. To everyone certified in PWR!Moves and to those involved in my PWR!Moves workshop, thank you, thank you so very much.

PWR! Logo

“There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.” Beverly Sills

Introduction: Coach Lou Holtz said “Ability is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.”  This got me thinking about ability, motivation and attitude but especially how vital both motivation and attitude are for living successfully with Parkinson’s.

Believe in Life in the Presence of Parkinson’s:
I’m a healthy person that happens to have Parkinson’s; this is what I believe:
I believe daily exercise enhances my life in the presence of Parkinson’s.
I believe people-with-Parkinson’s can become healthier with exercise.
I believe sustained exercise can promote neuroplasticity to re-wire my neural network.
I believe I have the ability to do the repetitions to re-train my brain.
I believe staying positive will help control the course of my Parkinson’s.
I believe having courage will provide mettle in the battle against my disorder.
I believe being persistent allows me to restrain my Parkinson’s.
I believe motivation begins from within, and there can be no backing down to this disease.
I believe if I don’t give up I can slow the progression of my disorder.
I believe if you pity me it feeds the hunger of my Parkinson’s.
I believe if you join my team, you can help me stall this slowly evolving disorder.
I believe attitude is the fuel to sustain the effort to combat Parkinson’s.
I believe in science that new therapies/strategies against Parkinson’s are on the horizon.
I believe exercise with ability, motivation and attitude will work to my advantage each day.
I believe that each new day renews my chance of slowing the beast named Parkinson’s.
My daily mantra is to never give up; I refuse to surrender to Parkinson’s.

“Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.” Mahatma Gandhi

Cover photo credit: https://c7.staticflickr.com/9/8615/16157237102_f15e505c19_b.jpg

 

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