Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) and Over-the-Counter Therapies in Parkinson’s

With Parkinson’s, exercise is better than taking a bottle of pills. If you don’t do anything you’ll just stagnate.” Brian Lambert

“With Parkinson’s you have two choices: You can let it control you, or you can control it. And I’ve chosen to control it.” US Senator Isakson

Introduction: Having one of the numerous neurodegenerative disorders can be disheartening, difficult and life-threatening/ending; however, Parkinson’s remains in the forefront of treatment schemes and therapeutic options.  We may have a slowly evolving disorder, yet I remain firmly entrenched both in striking back to try-to-slow its progression and in remaining hopeful that new advances are on the horizon to throttle-back its progression.  Recently, several people have asked for an update on my strategy for treating Parkinson’s.  My plan consists of (i) traditional Parkinson’s medication,  (ii) supplemented by a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approach, and (iii) fueled by exercise. My philosophy is simple because I truly believe there are steps I can follow to remain as healthy as possible, which include having a positive mindset to support this effort, and to accept the axiom of the harder I try the better I’ll be.

“Life is to be lived even if we are not healthy.” David Blatt

Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):The National Institutes of Health defines CAM as follows: “Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is the term for medical products and practices that are not part of standard medical care. ‘Complementary medicine’ refers to treatments that are used with standard treatment. ‘Alternative medicine’ refers to treatments that are used instead of standard treatment.”  Here is a nice overview of CAM (click here). The National Center for CAM (click here for NCCAM) gives five categories to broadly describe CAM (see below, and followed by some representative components for each of the 5 categories):

17.12.31.CAM_Summary

(1) Alternative medical systems include treatment by traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda and naturopathic medicine;
(2) Mind-body interventions like mindfulness meditation;
(3) Biologically-based therapies include over-the-counter natural products and herbal therapies;
(4) Manipulative and body-based methods describe chiropractic and massage therapies;
(5) Energy therapies include techniques such as Reiki and therapeutic touch.

“My way of dealing with Parkinson’s is to keep myself busy and ensure my mind is always occupied.” David Riley

CAM and Parkinson’s: Published CAM clinical trial studies have yielded only a sliver of positive response to slowing the progression of Parkinson’s, several were halted due to no change compared to the placebo-control group. Regardless of these ‘failed’ studies, many have embraced a CAM-based approach to managing their disorder, including me. Please remember that I’m not a clinician, and I’m not trying to convince you to adopt my strategy.  I am a biochemist trained in Hematology but I do read and ponder a lot, especially about Parkinson’s.  We know a lot about Parkinson’s and we’re learning a lot about the molecular details to how it promotes the disease.  There is not a cure although we have a growing array of drugs for therapeutic intervention.  Without a  cure, we look at the causes of Parkinson’s (see schematic below), we consider various CAM options, and we go from there (see schematic below). If you venture into adding to your portfolio of therapy, it is imperative you consult with your Neurologist/family medicine physician beforehand.  Your combined new knowledge with their experience can team-up to make an informed decision about your herb, over-the-counter compound use and its potential benefit/risk ratio.

17.12.31.PD_Cause.CAM“I discovered that I was part of a Parkinson’s community with similar experiences and similar questions that I’d been dealing with alone.”Michael J. Fox

A strategy for treating Parkinson’s: The treatment plan I follow uses traditional medical therapy, CAM (several mind-body/manual practices and numerous natural products) and the glue that ties it all together is exercise.  Presented here is an overview of my medical therapy and CAM natural products. I only list the exercises I am using, not describe or defend them.  Due to my own personal preference for the length of a blog post, I will return to them later this year and include an update of the mind-body/manual practices that I’m currently using. Please note that these views and opinions expressed here are my own. Content presented here is not meant as medical advice. Definitely consult with your physician before taking any type of supplements.   The schematic below gives a ‘big-picture’ view of my treatment strategy.

18.01.01.Daily_Take. brain.druge.CAM.Exercise

To some, my treatment plan may seem relatively conservative. It has been developed through conversations with my Neurologist and Internist.  This was followed by studying the medical literature on what has worked in Parkinson’s treatment, the list of compounds to consider was defined/refined (actually, my choice of OTC compounds has been trimmed from several years ago).  My CAM drug/vitamin/natural products strategy for treating Parkinson’s goes as follows: a) compounds (reportedly) able to penetrate the blood brain barrier; b) compounds (possibly) able to slow progression of the disorder; c) compounds that either are anti-oxidative or are anti-inflammatory; d) compounds that don’t adversely alter existing dopamine synthesis/activity; e) compounds that support overall body well-being; and f) compounds that support specific brain/nervous system health/nutrition. [Please consult with your physician before taking any type of supplements.] The Table below presents a detailed overview of my strategy for treating Parkinson’s.

18.01.01.DailyTherapy4Note of caution: Most herbs and supplements have not been rigorously studied as safe and effective treatments for PD. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements; therefore, there is no guarantee of safety, strength or purity of supplements.

REPLACING DOPAMINE:
On a daily basis, I use a combination of Carbidopa/Levodopa (25 mg/100 mg tablet x 4 daily, every 5 h on an empty stomach if possible, typically 6AM, 11AM, 4PM, 9PM) and a dopamine agonist Requip XL [Ropinirole 6 mg total (3 x 2 mg tablets) x 3 daily, every 6 h, typically 6AM, noon, 6PM).  This treatment strategy and amount combining Carbidopa/Levodopa and Ropinirole has been in place for the past 18 months (NOTE: I stopped using the additional dopamine agonist Neupro transdermal patch Rotigotine). For an overview on Carbidopa/Levodopa, I highly recommend the following 2 papers:
[1.] Ahlskog JE. Cheaper, Simpler, and Better: Tips for Treating Seniors With Parkinson Disease. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2011;86(12):1211-6. doi: https://doi.org/10.4065/mcp.2011.0443.
[2.] 1. Espay AJ, Lang AE. Common Myths in the Use of Levodopa in Parkinson Disease: When Clinical Trials Misinform Clinical Practice. JAMA Neurol. 2017. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.0348. PubMed PMID: 28459962.

ISRADIPINE:
An FDA-approved calcium-channel blocker (CCB) named Isradipine penetrates the blood brain barrier to block calcium channels and potentially preserve dopamine-making cells. Isradipine may slow the progression of Parkinson’s. The primary use of Isradipine is in hypertension; thus, to treat my pre-hypertension I switched from the diuretic Hydrochlorothiazide to the CCB Isradipine.  A CCB is a more potent drug than a diuretic; importantly, my blood pressure is quite normal now and maybe I’m slowing the progression of my Parkinson’s. Please see this blog post for a review of Isradipine (click here). [Please consult with your physician before taking any type of new medication.

ANTIOXIDANTS/VITAMINS/GENERAL HEALTH:
N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC; 600 mg x 3 daily) is a precursor to glutathione, a powerful anti-oxidant. In several studies, NAC has been shown to be neuroprotective in Parkinson’s (click here).  I have recently posted an overview of NAC (click here). Furthermore, the ‘Science of Parkinson’s disease’ has presented their usual outstanding quality in a blog post on NAC in PD (click here);
trans-Resveratrol (200 mg daily) is an antioxidant that crosses the blood-brain barrier, which could reduce both free-radical damage and inflammation in Parkinson’s. If you decide to purchase this compound, the biologically-active form is trans-Resveratrol. The ‘Science of Parkinson’s disease’ has an excellent blog post on Resveratrol in PD (click here);
Grape Seed (100 mg polyphenols, daily) is an antioxidant that crosses the blood-brain barrier, which could reduce both free-radical damage and inflammation in Parkinson’s;
Milk Thistle (Silybum Marianum, 300 mg daily) and its active substance Silymarin protects the liver.  Dr. Jay Lombard in his book, The Brain Wellness Plan, recommends people with PD who take anti-Parkinson’s drugs (metabolized through the liver) to add 300 mg of Silymarin (standardized milk thistle extract) to their daily medication regime.
Melatonin (3 mg 1 hr before sleep) Melatonin is a hormone that promotes sustained sleep. Melatonin is also thought to be neuroprotective (click here);
Probiotic Complex with Acidophilus is a source of ‘friendly’ bacteria to contribute to a healthy GI tract.
Vitamin (daily multiple)
A high-potency multivitamin with minerals to meet requirements of essential nutrients, see label for content [I only take 1 serving instead  of the suggested 2 gummies due to my concern about taking a large amount of Vitamin B6 as described in a recent blog (click here)]:
IMG_2059 copyVitamin D3 (5000 IU 3 times/week) is important for building strong bones. Now we also know that vitamin D3 is almost like ‘brain candy’ because it stimulates hundreds of brain genes, some of which are anti-inflammatory and some support nerve health (click here). Supplementation with vitamin D3 (1200 IU/day) for a year slowed the progression of a certain type of Parkinson’s (click here). Furthermore, augmentation with vitamin D3 was recently shown to slow cognitive issues in Parkinson’s (click here).

NO LONGER TAKE Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), Creatine and Vitamin E because they did not delay the progression of Parkinson’s or they were harmful.
NO LONGER TAKE a high potency Vitamin B Complex (see label below) due to my concern that a large excess vitamin B6 could be detrimental to Carbidopa/Levodopa (click here for blog post):
Screen Shot 2018-01-02 at 11.39.56 PM
List of several recent PubMed peer-reviewed CAM reviews (includes a more comprehensive overview of all areas of CAM in treating Parkinson’s):
Bega D, Zadikoff C. Complementary & alternative management of Parkinson’s disease: an evidence-based review of eastern influenced practices. J Mov Disord. 2014;7(2):57-66. doi: 10.14802/jmd.14009. PubMed PMID: 25360229; PMCID: PMC4213533.

Bega D, Gonzalez-Latapi P, Zadikoff C, Simuni T. A Review of the Clinical Evidence for Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Parkinson’s Disease. Current Treatment Options in Neurology. 2014;16(10):314. doi: 10.1007/s11940-014-0314-5.

Ghaffari BD, Kluger B. Mechanisms for alternative treatments in Parkinson’s disease: acupuncture, tai chi, and other treatments. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2014;14(6):451. doi: 10.1007/s11910-014-0451-y. PubMed PMID: 24760476.

Kim HJ, Jeon B, Chung SJ. Professional ethics in complementary and alternative medicines in management of Parkinson’s disease. J Parkinsons Dis. 2016;6(4):675-83. doi: 10.3233/JPD-160890. PubMed PMID: 27589539; PMCID: PMC5088405.

Kim TH, Cho KH, Jung WS, Lee MS. Herbal medicines for Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. PLoS One. 2012;7(5):e35695. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035695. PubMed PMID: 22615738; PMCID: PMC3352906.

Wang Y, Xie CL, Wang WW, Lu L, Fu DL, Wang XT, Zheng GQ. Epidemiology of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with Parkinson’s disease. J Clin Neurosci. 2013;20(8):1062-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2012.10.022. PubMed PMID: 23815871. 

Today we take control over our Parkinson’s:
Please stay focused on dealing with your disorder.
Please learn as much as you can about Parkinson’s.
Please work with your neurologist to devise your own treatment strategy.
Please stretch and exercise on a daily basis, it will make a difference.
Please be involved in your own disorder; it matters that you are proactive for you.
Please stay positive and focused as you deal with this slowly evolving disease.
Please stay hopeful you can mount a challenge to slow the progression.
Please remain persistent; every morning your battle renews and you must be prepared.

 

In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer.  And that makes me happy. For it says that no matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger – something better, pushing right back.” Albert Camus

Cover photo credit: news.nowmedia.co.za/medialibrary/Article/109153/Wine-grape-crop-6-7-down-in-2016-800×400.jpg

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s